Be More Like Pittsburgh

This post has nothing to do with the NFL or sports.  I don’t really even like sports.  Only athletes.  See the right hand column for my very favorites.

Moving on to why Durham (or any place) should be more like Pittsburgh:

Iron City looks out for its bicyclists.

[via Zachary Slobig @ GOOD]

Advertisements

January 25, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Video. Leave a comment.

Julia GP Haupt’s Top 10 Knife City Creamery Posts

So lucky to have Julia as a reader! What a lady!!

Julia: The following is not a Top Ten List of your ten best blog posts. It’s my top ten list of posts that stuck with me (some for good reason, and some for no apparent reason). But I read and loved all of your posts (all as in 90%).

1. Yoke Cake!

[image via Amyland Cake Company]

2. And I’m Proud to Be an American

[image via fieq mayhem]

3. Freddie de Boer’s Digital Book Club

[image via flixter]

4. 10 Simple Rules for Editing Wikipedia

[image via xkcd]

5. Favorite Poemer Delivers Again

[image via Luke Johnson]

6. Smaced in the Privets

[image via gconnect]

7. The Cringe at the Heart of Christmas

[image via fandango]

8. Professional Packer

[image via mtbr]

9. Refurbished Bicycles Make Good Gates

[image via dude craft]

10. Incredible McDonalds Burger Experiment

[image via snack girl]

December 21, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Crowdsourcing. Leave a comment.

New Danny MacAskill Video

[via Kottke]

November 19, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Video. Leave a comment.

Refurbished Bicycles Make Good Gates

[Bike Guerilla via Dude Craft]

November 7, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , . Art. 2 comments.

Bicycle Reclamation of City Space

“Part design solution, part political statement, the concept was a finalist at the IIDA 2010 global design competition and aptly reflects this year’s competition theme of “Green Heart” – a call for using design as a marriage of sustainability and civic joy.”

[via Maria Popova @ Big Think]

October 18, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Art. Leave a comment.

Track Standoff

You know I love track stands, but what is this I don’t even.

[via a post on an entirely unrelated topic by Iljitsch van Beijnum @ Ars Technica]

October 5, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Video. Leave a comment.

Future Chainless Bike

No grease.

Seamless gear shifting.

Do want.

[Rebecca Boyle @ Popular Science via John Farrier @ Neatorama]

[images via stringbike.com]

September 29, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Smarts. 3 comments.

Impressive Bike Switch

I’ve always had a very hard time with track stands, but it may be because my bikes have never been fixed-gear. Here are two talented bros swapping fixies mid track stand:

Jealous!

[via Scott Beale @ Laughing Squid]

September 22, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , . Video. 1 comment.

Dope

Lance Armstrong taking the Pete Rose approach:

As long as I live, I will deny it. There was absolutely no way I forced people, encouraged people, told people, helped people, facilitated. Absolutely not. One hundred percent.

His choice of words here is interesting even though his grammar is abhorrant.

Personal opinion: People who say “100 percent,” regardless of context, are attempting to blow smoke up your ass.

My thoughts on this whole “Lance Thing” are scattered. You may not care at all, gentle reader. Be assured though that Armstrong’s handlers care deeply what you think, and for good reason. His legacy is at stake and by proxy, so is his charitable foundation. In fact, in the New York Times article mentioned below, there is this sense that his people don’t care what his transgressions are/were since ‘his good acts outweigh his bad ones.’ Sounds like a sideways admission of guilt to me.

Interesting excerpt from the great NYT article on the subject:

Jay Coakley, a sociologist and the author of “Sports in Society: Issues and Controversies,” said that he had no doubt that Mr. Armstrong was guilty of doping, but that it did not matter. For athletes, he said, the line between performance enhancement and medical treatment has become so fuzzy that it is impossible to discern.

“Deciding to use performance-enhancing substances and methods has nothing to do with lack of morality,” Mr. Coakley said. “It has to do with normative structure of elite sport, and the athlete’s commitment to his identity as an athlete.”

Such a great insight. It leads well into an NPR story I heard days later that chronicles Katherine Hamilton’s decision to opt out of sports entirely:

“There is an untold story,” she said, “about all the thousands … who make a conscious decision, that are really great athletes doing the right thing, working really hard — and they just drop out because they’re just not willing to do the things to your body and to go down that road.”

In other words, athletes who don’t just say no to drugs, but no to sport[.]

Doping may be a (very) roundabout way to help cancer patients, but it’s also the apparent cause of other types of societal illness.

[Bruce Weber and Juliet Macur @ the New York Times via the Browser]

[image via correct-weight-loss.net]

September 16, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Reading. 2 comments.

Bicycles aint People

Felix Salmon bikes to work everyday. To Reuters HQ. In the heart of New York City.

Let’s take all the different permutations in order. To begin with, there’s the old bike-free status quo, where the possible interactions are pedestrian-pedestrian, pedestrian-motorist, or motorist-motorist. It’s worth thinking about these a bit, because they’re deeply ingrained in us, and they’re responsible for shaping the way we see everything else. […]

The trouble all starts when you drop bicyclists into the mix. At that point, a whole new set of combinations comes into play, and as a city we haven’t worked out how to make them work.

Salmon goes on to present his “Unified Theory of New York Biking,” which is solid no matter where you live.

Kottke weighs in:

If this was a manifesto, I’d sign it.

[Felix Salmon @ Reuters via the Browser]

[image via Doghouse Diaries]

September 14, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Reading. Leave a comment.

Next Page »