Nemo Németh’s Top 10 Things He “Thumbs Up”

Nemo has ten thumbs?  Weird.  Here are his top 10 in no particular order:

  • A hot tea and a warm helmet on a cold day.
  • Slamming the weight down after a successful heavy clean and jerk or snatch
  • Scoring goals
  • The sweet scent of lingering perfume of tall brunette women with curly hair
  • Skydiving on breezy summer days
  • Daft Punk

Daft Punk – Derezzed [via Le Touch]

  • Lake Balaton

[images via Sunshine Estates and Destination 360]
  • A big bite of a green apple that makes that crunchy noise
  • The smell of crisp air when winter turns spring
  • The feeling of full throttle acceleration on the motorcycle

Hungarian teen idol.

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December 17, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Crowdsourcing. Leave a comment.

Freddie de Boer’s Digital Book Club

[image via geetika perpetually confused]

Freddie used to run one of my favorite blogs.  He had passion, ideas, intellectual honesty, and the ability to articulate his case like no one else.  And then, one day, he shut it down.

[…] ultimately it comes down to simply this: I am incapable of writing on the Internet without becoming an asshole.  This fact has asserted itself to me again and again.  And while I believe the blogosphere is a narrow-minded and vulgar space, there is no excuse for my own vulgarity, my own lack of compassion, my own failure.  I have tried reform; I have tried rededication; I have tried genre and tonal shifts.  Sooner or later I revert to my hands, this keyboard, and my anger.

He probably needed to walk away even though I didn’t want him to.  Still, I was elated when, last week, a new post from L’Hôte indicated that Freddie was back and he had a new project:  a book club focusing on discussing Umberto Eco’s the Name of the Rose.  I know next to nothing about Eco, this book, or the time period it’s set in.  Oh well.  Reading starts tomorrow.

It’s my intention, if any are interested, to engage with readers of this remarkable book.  I am not qualified to be a guide, but perhaps a companion is sufficient.  My hope is to begin the book club on December 7th and proceed through the novel in about two months.  As the date approaches, I’ll post with my ideas for the structural makeup and logistics of this book club.  It’s my hope that everything I write exists in a context with a community of commenters, of whatever size.

So get to a library, a used book store, or dust off your dad’s old copy like I did.  This is a great time to read, as Freddie can tell you.

Winter is a season for reading, for turning inwards, into interior warmth.  I mean this in the simplest sense and less speakable ones as well.  It’s cold out, in winter, and to curl up with a book in the light of a fire in your own hearth is wonderful

More details can be found at the book club’s discussion hub.

December 6, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , . Reading. 3 comments.

Ten Most Important Fonts

Kanye West gets emotional over fonts.

He’s not the only one.  Paul Shaw:

If Akkurat is so special (and it seems to me to just be one of several worthy attempts to find an alternative to Akzidenz Grotesk and Helvetica) then I would love it if you give your rationale as a post. Tell us why it will have a massive impact.

I am not sure why you think these are typefaces most relevant to Americans? Other than Yale, Clearview and Retina they are available to everyone and I am sure are used elsewhere besides the USA. (And I think James Montalbano and Don Meeker would love to get Clearview used in a European or Chinese highway system.) […]

For those who are championing Gotham, please give a rationale. Is it because it is popular? or because it is an alternative to Futura (with a more legible lowercase a)? or because it was used for the cornerstone of the beleaguered Freedom Tower? or because y’all just love the Port Authority Terminal?

That was Paul defending his list of what he considers to be the 10 most important typefaces of the past decade.  The list is beautiful, but the real joy is found when reading the ensuing discussion.  Designers argue like fencers.

Bonus: Care to get emotional over Calango’s motional font, Moshun?

My favorite is the P.

[Paul Shaw’s font dissertation @ imprint via Kottke]

September 13, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Art. Leave a comment.

Do Kids Even Know About Books?

[via Mark Frauenfelder @ Boing Boing]

September 9, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , . Reading. Leave a comment.

Nancy Drew

[via Hark! A Vagrant]

September 4, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , . Comics. Leave a comment.

Narrative

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the use of narrative in scientific writing. The primary reason is my job (which consists of much reading), but coming in at a close second is an article by the author of Black Hawk Down, Mark Bowden.

What initially grabbed me was a scene that could have come straight from the Wire.

So then we left, and we pulled up in front of the housing project outside of Annapolis. And I thought, “This is odd. Why would the major drug dealers in Anne Arundel County be living in the projects? Don’t they make any money dealing drugs?” That night, I watched as they banged on doors and they dragged people out in their pajamas and their underwear, and they rounded everybody up, and made a big commotion. The following morning, like seven o’clock in the morning, they had this very dramatic press conference in Annapolis, where they had invited all of the reporters from the newspapers in Washington and Baltimore and Annapolis, and TV and radio—it was a big deal. And laid out on tables in front so they could all get pictures were all the drugs they had seized from the housing projects the night before.

[…]

I wrote what happened, beginning with the party in the parking lot, with the beer and the urinating, and then going on to my description of the unfortunates being roused from their apartments. And then we come to the press conference, and I describe the drugs that were on the table accurately and estimate what they’re worth, and then I quote the Anne Arundel County spokesman claiming that this is $800,000 worth of drugs.

The story was an enormous hit. My editors loved it, the readers loved it. It was a narrative. It was my way out of a thorny problem. Captain Lindsey was very unhappy with me, but he couldn’t be angry with me, because he knew that everything in the story was true.

Very compelling read throughout.

[Mark Bowden @ Nieman Storyboard via the Browser]

[image via Wikimedia Commons]

August 31, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Reading. Leave a comment.

Better Book Title

AKA Ulysses.

[Better Book Titles via Alex Santoso @ Neatorama]

August 18, 2010. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Comics. Leave a comment.